How Dostoevsky portrays women in his novels
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How Dostoevsky portrays women in his novels a feminist analysis by Katherine Jane Briggs

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Published by Edwin Mellen Press in Lewiston, N.Y .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, -- 1821-1881 -- Characters -- Women,
  • Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, -- 1821-1881 -- Religion,
  • Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, -- Criticism and interpretation,
  • Women in literature,
  • Theology in literature,
  • Feminism and literature

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

StatementKatherine Jane Briggs ; with a foreword by Joe Andrew.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPG3328.Z7 W653 2009
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 325 p. ;
Number of Pages325
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24033003M
ISBN 100773437746
ISBN 109780773437746
LC Control Number2009041532

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The biographical sketch describes Dostoevsky's public life as a novelist and journalist, and also his private life as a husband and father, including the personal relationships and events in his life which may be supposed to have influenced his writing about women and judybwolfman.com: Katherine Jane Briggs. This study explores the relationship between public work and influence, and private faith and spiritual development, through the female characters in Dostoevsky's novels; and also the influence of one writer upon another. The intention was, first, to establish whether, in literary terms, women may be viewed as characters in their own right, rather than merely as symbols or consorts for the men Pages: How Dostoevsky Portrays Women in His Novels book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. How Dostoevsky Portrays Women in His Novels book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. How Dostoevsky Portrays Women in His Novels book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers.5/5(1). Nov 14,  · Dostoevsky's Heroines or On the Compassion of the Russian Woman –pt To illustrate the feminine character of compassionate love, we will first explain why women are important in Dostoevsky’s vision of Russian salvation.

Search Tips. Phrase Searching You can use double quotes to search for a series of words in a particular order. For example, "World war II" (with quotes) will give more precise results than World war II (without quotes). Wildcard Searching If you want to search for multiple variations of a word, you can substitute a special symbol (called a "wildcard") for one or more letters. Childhood (–) Fyodor Dostoevsky, born on 11 November [O.S. 30 October] , was the second child of Dr. Mikhail Dostoevsky and Maria Dostoevskaya (born Nechayeva).He was raised in the family home in the grounds of the Mariinsky Hospital for the Poor, which was in a lower class district on the edges of Moscow. Dostoevsky encountered the patients, who were at the lower end of the Children: Sonya (), Lyubov (–), . “Great writers, I discovered, were not to be bowed down before and worshipped, but embraced and befriended. Their names resounded through history not because they had massive brows and thought deep incomprehensible thoughts, but because they opened windows in the mind, they put their arms round you and showed you things you always knew but never dared to believe. The best way to get acquainted with Dostoyevsky is by reading Crime and judybwolfman.com of the best-known books by the author, as well as a must-read for all Russian kids at .

How Dostoevsky Portrays Women In His Novels: A Feminist Analysis by Katherine Jane Briggs / / English / PDF. Read Online MB Download. A new conversation between 19th century Russian literature and present-day feminist theology is initiated through consideration of Dostoevsky's art in relation to women and the Gospel. The biographical. A keen reader will notice certain repetitions in Dostoevsky’s novels – not of themes or motifs, though those do exist. There is a much more subtle repetition in his The mention of a man brutally murdering two women in The Idiot is the never specifically acknowledges it in his Author: Elizabeth J Ewald. The intention was, first, to establish whether, in literary terms, women may be viewed as characters in their own right, rather than merely as symbols or consorts for the men; and, secondly, whether, from a feminist theological perspective, Dostoevsky takes seriously the experience of women in terms of their relationships and work, Christian. His harrowing experiences in Russian prisons, combined with a profound religious philosophy, formed the basis for his greatest books: Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, The Possessed, and The Brothers Karamazov. When Dostoevsky died in , he left a legacy of masterful novels that immortalized him as a giant of Russian literature.